Jun 212016
 

Flashback to December 11, 2013 at 4:59pm.DSCN1534

Two chimneys: one for the oil furnace, one for the wood-burning insert in the fireplace.

A light dusting of snow melts soonest where the 2X6 rafters are all that lies between the warm air of the kids’ bedrooms upstairs and the roof. They show like ribs on a feverish, bedridden child.

DSCN1535

At the back of the house the cat door leaks heat into the neighbourhood. Among the clearly defined rafters are splotches of dark where the snow has melted around the plumbing and  roof vents as well as above the joint between the original house and the shed addition.

Between the rafters in these photos–under those rectangular blocks of snow–is fiberglass batt insulation. Its insulation value is probably about R14.

As we get ready to fill the roof rafters of the newly renovated house with insulation, it’s important to look back and see what we’re aiming for. R28 spray foam insulation plus an addition of approximately R14 batts. DSC03911

That makes R42–an R28 improvement over the old house.

This winter, and in every winter from now on, when it snows on Hammond Forever House, all you will see on the roof is snow. I like to think it will take the sun and a warm day to melt it off.

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