Jul 072014
 

It must have been the thirties that plumbing came to Hammond. It was then that the pump house that my mother-in-law remembers had been between the house and the road, outside the kitchen window, was moved.

The house in 2009 before we painted. The pump house was on the right side of the house, where a rhododendron is now.

The house in 2009 before we painted. The pump house was to the right side of this photo, where a rhododendron is now.

 

A new addition was added to the rear of the house. It had a simple shed roof which ran almost the length of the house, stopping about three feet short for some reason.

DSCN0419

The rear in 2009.

Some fun facts in this photo. 1. The new pump room was in that basement window, next to the basement door. 2. The first window on the right is the bathroom window. 3. The second window was the pantry with a sink under the window. 4. Two holes are visible next to the pantry window. The bottom one is now a cat door. In this photo, the top one has just been filled in. These holes were the ventilation for a “cold cupboard” in the pantry. They were screened, but otherwise left open to allow air to circulate and keep food in the cupboard to stay cool. 5. The screen door and windows on the far left were not there originally–that was an open back porch. Those windows, and the stained glass ones in the living room, are the only single-paned windows left in the house. The rest were replaced with custom-fit, wood-framed, double-paned windows by my very smart in-laws.

The new bathroom was connected to the kitchen diagonally and the kitchen sink was under the window of the added pantry.

The new bathroom was connected to the kitchen diagonally and the kitchen sink was under the window of the added pantry.

This is the basement. You can see the basement door but next to it should be a smaller room, the pump room, which was not drawn. The ceiling under the addition is even lower than the rest of the basement.

This is the basement. You can see the basement door and a long thin space under the rest of the addition. A smaller room, the pump room, which is next to the corridor to the door, is not drawn here

We learned from Annabel the architect that modern thinking in regards to heritage does not seek to freeze a home in time nor restore it to the way it was first built. She will correct me if I’m wrong, but I believe the idea is to tell a story of the natural evolution of a building.

This shed addition to add (then) modern plumbing (bathroom and kitchen sink) to the house is a reasonable progression in-keeping with the original Craftsman-style. Annabel pointed out that the front of the house has a peaked “gabled” roof which thrusts out to cover the front porch.

Many houses of this period have gabled roofs at the front and shed roofs at the back. That gives a more impressive “public” face to welcome people to your home and a simpler, cleaner look to the back.

Once Annabel pointed this out, Leanne and I quickly decided we would like to follow that pattern, whether or not the Heritage Agreement required us to.

In section you can see the low ceilings of the basement--even lower under the addition.

In section you can see the low ceilings of the basement–even lower under the addition.

In this last drawing you can see there is an opportunity, when addressing the bathroom above, to improve the ceiling height in the basement. Leanne’s grandmother was apparently pretty short and didn’t mind washing clothes in the concrete sink that still sits there. As for me, I spend as little time as possible down there.

Well, we might as well…

I took this photo today. Gables on the front and a natural shed addition on the back.

I took this photo today. Gables on the front and a natural shed addition on the back.

 

 

  One Response to “The Original Shed Addition”

  1. […] 1923 they used a well for water and, presumably, an outhouse. When running water became available, the shed addition was built on with a back porch, a kitchen pantry and a bathroom. There was no municipal sewer yet, […]

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