Jul 102014
 

The summer of 2011 was an impatient time for Leanne and I.

We had done a fair amount of work ourselves on the house including remodeling the kitchen, master bedroom, and kids bedrooms. We had also been through the process, with the help of Leanne’s parents, of insulating and sealing the house as best we could and successfully applied for a Livesmart BC grant for making the house more efficient.

What could have been the final job, the bathroom and the foundation issues below it, was how on hold. We had begun the process of obtaining our Heritage Revitalization Agreement which meant research and paperwork.

I have a strong memory of the competing voices in my head. The voice saying, “get ‘er done!” was being told, “sit down and shut up” and it was not happy.

It is one thing to say that the longer you plan a reno, the better your plan will be and the more money you will save, but it is another to be forced into that position by zoning bylaws. It is like your parents making you do something that you know is good for you.

This is not my child. My kids love peas.

This is not my child. My kids love peas.

I don’t want to keep you in suspense, however, so here is what we arrived at working with Annabel for the rear addition.

With an eye to continuing the natural evolution of the house, she suggested we extend the original shed addition out further right across the back of the house. That will extend the back wall of the bathroom and leave room for a larger bedroom closet and no need to move the existing closet door.

It also left us with a choice of enlarging the office (once the pantry) and the sunroom (the walled-in porch). We decided to give ourselves a living space we would enjoy far more: a large covered porch. This porch will let us enjoy the garden in any weather and host outdoor dinners in the summer.  The thought of it made Leanne and I noticeably happier. My Dad said:

The new back porch certainly looks big enough for large summer dinners, (especially if it is screened to foil wasps) great for parties.

Annabel provided us with as-is drawings as well as plans. Take a look!

The north side of the original shed addition

The north side of the original shed addition

The planned addition roof goes higher up the main roof. There is a window for the closet and one over the bath.

The planned addition roof goes higher up the main roof. There is a window for the closet and one over the bath.

In section you can see the low ceilings of the basement--even lower under the addition.

In section you can see the low ceilings of the basement–even lower under the addition.

A section of the planned addition. You can see the outline of the existing addition.

A section of the planned addition. You can see the outline of the existing addition.

Looking North at the walled in porch (now the sunroom) and back steps. Under the sunroom is a crawl space with a dirt floor.

Looking North at the walled in porch (now the sunroom) and back steps. Under the sunroom is a crawl space with a dirt floor.

The sunroom remains but leads out onto a generous porch. The original style is maintained.

The sunroom remains but leads out onto a generous porch. The original style is maintained.

The hatching shows what is new construction. There is a new basement stairwell and wow, what a great porch!

The hatching shows what is new construction. There is a new basement stairwell and wow, what a great porch!

The idea here is to carefully consider our long-term life in the house so that, when Maple Ridge Council approves our Heritage Agreement, we will be ready to apply for permits. We’re planning in bulk here and we don’t want to have to return, hat in hand, for a Heritage Alteration Permit, once we’re designated heritage, do we?

Heh. Of course the cost of the reno has gone up since those first napkin sketches, but we won’t have to do this all at once. Will we?

 

 

  7 Responses to “Extend the Shed Addition”

  1. I looked at your plans because I was wondering if you were planning a cold room in the basement. We have one and I love it. It didn’t cost any extra money (if you pour a new foundation) and it maintains below 65 degrees even in a heat wave. We have a 4×6 room for cereal, root veggies, preserves and wine (of course). You can stop by during the bard after party if you want to see it.

    • Thanks Sherry! I’m going to share the basement plans next. Leanne’s parents have a root cellar and they love it. There is always one more thing we should do “while we’re at it” but maybe we should think about that. Are the walls of your cold room concrete, like a bunker?

      • The walls are concrete – framed and drywalled but not insulated. It is entirely underground with no venting and we carried the floating engineered floor through for continuity (and to avoid a step). The door from the TV room into the cold room is a solid core exterior door to keep the cold in. I would have been fine leaving the walls bare but everyone looked at me funny.

  2. […] considered these ideas, but ultimately are very happy with the current plan, outdoor stairwell and […]

  3. […] reno? Nope. Ridgewater Homes is going to help us hold up the house and dig a deeper basement, extend the addition at the back and add a dormer on the top floor, but the wiring and all the finishing will be left for us to […]

  4. Thanks Jimmy, feel free to add another comment here about your idea and Kickstarter campaign. My first impression is that another product is not especially needed where soap is concerned. We just need to buy more soap. 🙂

  5. […] are new windows in the extended addition which give natural light to the bathroom and master […]

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